SCHOOL IN MOTION IN SAXONY

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LEARNING IN MOTION

 

 

 

 

 

Why do pupils almost always have to sit when learning? Why is the teacher, in contrast, allowed to walk up and down in the classroom, but the pupils are not? Isn’t it possible that moving even supports learning? Or is a time of exercise rather lost time for reaching the aims of learning at school? Because exercise eventually disturbs the process of teaching, doesn’t it?
There are a lot of questions to answer and therefore we have been checking a great amount of possibilities for learning in motion in all the subjects at school. Selected contents for your subjects you can find in the following menu and of course in the literature presented.
In order to encourage you to make your own experiences, we want to draw your attention to the results of our research showing that, after four years of learning in motion, primary school students
• showed an increasing pleasure in learning,
• avoided constancy of posture,
• show a positive social behaviour and
• reached results that are comparable to traditional taught pupils
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For the girls and boys of forms five to ten (aged 11-17) similar tendencies can be seen. We assume that for those pupils exercise activities while learning will…

 

 

 

 

 

... open up additional accesses of information for learning.

 

... help optimising the processing of information.

 

 

 

At school, learning methods are mainly based on acoustic and visual stimuli. The child looks at the new letter on the blackboard and listens to the corresponding sound. Besides these senses and the senses we need to smell, taste and touch, another one can support learning. Through kinaesthesia whose receptors are spread within the whole body in muscles, sinews, ligaments and joints, the pupil can receive additional information about the contents of learning.

 

Exercises with a low intensity (walking, standing up, sitting down) are already sufficient to optimise the supply of oxygen and sugar of our brain and therefore to improve the processing of information. Mental components (the lack of the necessity to sit still as well as the increase of motivation through one’s own activity) help to ease learning and to create a school with a focus on the pupil's needs.

 

 

 

 

 

Biology

Biology

History

History

Chemistry

Chemistry

Art

Art

German

German

Maths

Maths

Ethics

Ethics

Music

Music

Foreign Languages

Foreign Languages

Physics

Physics

Social Studies / Politics

Social Studies / Politics

Religion

Religion

Geography

Geography

 

 

 

 

 

Literature:

Müller, Chr. et al. (2006). Bewegtes Lernen für die Klassen 1 bis 4. Didaktisch-methodische Anregungen für die Fächer Mathematik, Deutsch, Sachunterricht , (3. Aufl.). St. Augustin: Academia.

Müller, Chr. et al. (2003, 2009). Bewegtes Lernen in den Klassen I bis 4 . Fächer: Englisch Anfangsunterricht (ISBN 3-89665-286-9), Ethik (ISBN 3-89665-285-0), Kunst (ISBN 3-89665-284-2), Musik (ISBN 3-89665-482-3)

Müller, Chr. et al. (2016). Bewegtes Lernen für die Klassen 5 bis 10/12 . Fächer: Deutsch (ISBN 978-3-89665-689-6), Ethik (ISBN 978-3-89665-690-2). (jeweils 2. neu bearb. und erweiterte Aufl.)

Müller, Chr. et al. (2014, 2015). Bewegtes Lernen für die Klassen 5 bis 10/12 . Fächer: Fremdsprachen – Englisch (ISBN 978-3-89665-289-7), Biologie (ISBN 978-3-89665-661-2), Geschichte (ISBN 978-3-89665-642-1), Mathematik (ISBN 978-3-89665-644-5). (jeweils 2. neu bearb. Aufl.), Chemie (ISBN 978-3-89665-638-4). St. Augustin: Academia.

Müller, Chr. et al. (2004, 2005). Bewegtes Lernen für die Klassen 5 bis 10/12. Fächer: Sozialkunde/GK/Politik (ISBN 3-89665-303-2)., Evangelische Religion (ISBN 3-89665-304-0), Kunst (ISBN 3-89665-344-X), Musik (ISBN 3-89665-345-8), Physik (ISBN 3-89665-342-3), Geografie (ISBN 3-89665-341-5). St. Augustin: Academia.